Photo: Robert Clark

If your first name peaked in popularity in the groovy 1970s, chances are it’s not on the list of the most popular US homebuyer names in 2017.

And while more “old fashioned” first names like “Gerald” slipped, multiple hip Millennial names grew in prevalence in the 2017 homebuying pool, according to a new report by ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation’s largest multi-sourced property database.

In order to determine which first names were the most common among homebuyers last year, ATTOM analyzed more than four million single-family home sales in attempt to discover which generations are becoming more active or less active as homebuyers.

Unsurprisingly, Millennials are the largest growing generation of homebuyers as they are aging into their prime homebuying years. Conversely, Generation Xers and the Silent Generation are growing less active in the marketplace.

Nationally, the first names Dylan, Chelsea, Austin, Alexandra and Taylor saw the biggest gains in popularity among 2017 homebuyers. All of these names were popular as baby names between 1992 and 1995 — prime Millennial years.

Interestingly, the name Dylan spiked in popularity in 1992 and then again in 2001, indicating that another round of homebuyers named Dylan could be entering the market a decade down the road. The name gained in popularity among homebuyers from last year by 41 percent in 2017, the largest gain recorded nationally among all first names.

Meantime, the biggest decreases in popularity included the first names Gerald, Kristin, Stanley, Kurt and Jaime — names that gained popularity between 1916 and 1976 among Gen Xers, the Silent Generation and the Greatest Generation. “Gerald” fell in popularity among buyers by 19 percent in 2017 compared to 2016, the largest decrease recorded.

The name trends vary state to state. Over the last year, the name Margaret grew hotter by 54 percent among New York homebuyers, while “Rebecca” fell off by 40 percent. And, “Ashley” — an ever popular name among Millennial females — was white hot among New Jersey homebuyers, growing by a whopping 70 percent from last year.

Click here to read the entire report.

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