Photo: Zillow

A one-of-a-kind historic home in Seattle’s Queen Anne neighborhood just hit the market for $7.8 million. Designed in 1899 by Edwin W. Houghton, the architect best known for the architecture at the Moore Theatre, the house was originally built for attorney Charles A. Riddle.

The Riddle House is considered Seattle’s most prominent example of the Shingle style. According to the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods, the home was featured in the book “Homes and Gardens of the Pacific Coast, 1913,” which noted the well-lighted and sunny rooms.

Photo: Zillow

The interior was remodeled in 1941 by architect Otis Hancock, with further interior changes in 1980. A restoration and a small addition were done by Hoshide Williams Architects in 2000.

Photo: Zillow

Charles and Louise Riddle lived in the home until his death in 1928. Shortly afterward, the house was purchased by Dr. Lilian Irwin, an obstetrician. Dr. Irwin had been a teacher in central Oregon when she decided to go to medical school, a rarity for women of that time period. Irwin graduated from Cooper Medical College (later Stanford University Medical School) in San Francisco in 1898. Her sister, Dr. Ada Collison, was a pediatrician who died in 1932. Dr. Irwin was one of the very few women in Seattle maintaining a private practice; she retired after fifty years in 1949.

Photo: Zillow

The most recent restoration of the home features high-end finishes and period details. A massive kitchen offers a butler’s pantry, island seating and an eating area with beautiful views.

Photo: Zillow

The theater room is similar to the Majestic Bay Theater in Ballard, with blue velvet curtains.

Photo: Zillow

Three balconies overlook the skyline and nearly every room offers a view of Puget Sound or the Space Needle. With six bedrooms, five bathrooms, a guest suite, wine cellar, yard and two-car garage, this home has it all.

Photo: Zillow

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